Karl Marx

by / Filed under Thinking

Wheen argues that mythologising or demonising Marx for twentieth century mass murder misses the point. From this point of view it’s a really useful biography. One case where getting to the man behind the work is of some importance. Most of the time it’s simple distraction.

Marx wasn’t very nice to his mum. He’s already very likeable, though.

(Completed 14 February 2012): this book performs the valuable function of detaching Marx from his many legends, which means the work can be viewed as a product of a real person existing at a real point in time. The work doesn’t suffer in the slightest from this process: On the contrary, it seems more relevant and grounded.

It’s vg on synchronising the chaos and upheaval in Marx’ life with the birth of the mighty Capital.

And very sad that only two of Marx’ children outlived him, and that they went on to commit suicide.